History

of the historical bratwurst restaurant “Zum Gulden Stern” going back to 1419

Zirkelschmiedsgasse: the cobbled street on which Nuremberg’s leading bratwurst kitchen stood way back when, was originally known as “Auf dem Hohen Pflaster”. Today No. 26 is still home to Nuremberg’s leading bratwurst restaurant.

 

Besides the castle and the former St. Egidien Monastery, the area surrounding the St. Jacob Church belongs to Nuremberg’s earliest settlement hubs. Ownership of land surrounding the area forming the St. Lorenz Church parish has been vast and varied.

 

Originally the land belonged to the king and was usurped by the governor of the castle during the turmoil of the interregnum. In 1304 the then Castellan Conrad gifted the German Order with it. In the 15th century the Nuremburg Council took receipt of the Order’s dues to the new landowners for the sections of land that had been besieged in the interim.

 

1419
It was in connection with these dues to the new landowners that the premises at No. 26 Zirkelschmiedsgasse, which was then known as "Auf dem hohen Pflaster", were documented for the first time. It was probably one of the first houses that was built around 1375. It comprises two houses and if dues had to be paid on each one then it would have generated: “all of 60 old German coins per year on Walpurgis night and on the Feast of St. Martin, as well as a hen for Shrovetide.” (It might not necessarily have been the fattest hen.)The city of Nuremberg tried to limit the number of taverns and eateries that had sprung up during the Thirty Years’ War.
Once again No. 26 Zirkelschmiedsgasse was in the spotlight making history.

 

1640
The “Zum Gulden Stern” tavern and eatery was categorised as an upscale eating house.

 

1641

It was awarded the rarely accorded right to carry out the slaughtering of pigs on-site.

 

1740

On being accorded the vintner license, the town’s beverage levy authority was permitted to have a wine warehouse.

 

1980

Martin Hilleprandt acquired the premises with a “Demolition License“. The oldest – and arguably one of the most stunning – eating houses in Nuremberg was saved and restored thanks to the aid of the friends of the old town.

 

The gap between the Middle Ages and the present day has been successfully bridged.